32 Comments

And your last sentence summed it up as I smiled throughout reading this. What a great place. I might have cleared my TBR shelf but my To Be Visited list grows ever longer. Also your footnotes caught me out I first read the 2 against Kitsch as Kitsch Squared. Then again ....

Wonderful share....

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Kitsch squared is an appropriate analysis!

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Jul 16, 2023Liked by Andrew Eberlin

How about "The future is behind" :)?

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Really cosmic. Promote critical experimentation, whatever that’s exactly is a great idea

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I haven’t got a clue what half of it means and that’s why I like it. Pretentiousness is rare these days!

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It’s like a square Gaudi in the heart of London. 🤓 I get the other half of that, making expensive experimental stuff and (try to)make it profitable

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Great photos and what a cool house. I can imagine a dream assignment here for Architectual Digest.

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It would be a dream assignment. I’d like to return as I missed so much.

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Very nice — I'd never heard about this house, and I moved to London when Dickens was writing his early novels. Thanks Andrew!

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Glad you like it despite it adding kitsch to the insides of a Dickensian era house.

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This house looks like it would be at home IN THE OCEAN. It looks..... nautical / seaworthy. Love the detail work, not spare, not overdone.

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I hadn’t thought about that but you’re right. It does have an oceanic feel about it.

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It's there, but IMPLIED rather than " splashed ( ? ) " over the architecture. & correct me if I'm wrong, but I think that I spy some Art Deco touches as well.

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There’s a bit of everything - including Art Deco.

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A smorgasbord. Looks like a great place to hang about & photograph.

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Absolutely love it.

Wanton exuberant creativity.

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Thanks Paul. Yes, it's exuberance is infectious!

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Jul 15, 2023Liked by Andrew Eberlin

This lifted my spirits so thank you for both the photos and the writing. I enjoyed this tour, and as I live in Aotearoa New Zealand I will likely only tour it via your photos. I love the playfulness and the way the character of the owners links to the space. They didn't tear it down, they brought something old and something new, something modern and post modern to the past. The house evokes for me a house laughing at itself the way children laugh at the adult they might one day be and it is sad that often adults forget to laugh like children. This house gives us a chance. And I love the mirrors in the garden because gardens are about reflections, about man-made time deconstructed back into seasons so we can look back and ahead, behind and beyond.

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Beautifully put. I would like to revisit. There is so much to see, experience and absorb. I missed a lot.

I picked up a free booklet called '21 Games You Can Play With a Cosmic House' which made me chuckle. In particular one 'rule' for the game The Ideal House Guest:

"This is a game to be played in your head. It's over when you're bored of it."

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My head is spinning! Wow and wowsa!

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It’s an amazing and unique experience!

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Jul 15, 2023Liked by Andrew Eberlin

I need to see this beautiful home in person.

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Yes, do try and get a ticket if you can! They go fast.

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Jul 12, 2023Liked by Andrew Eberlin

I visited there last summer, it's absolutely divine. I am a long-time fan of post-modernism.

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Yes it was an amazing experience. It’s encouraged me to learn more about Post Modernism. I’ve just bought the Blue Crow map for London and ‘Less is Bore’ (I couldn’t resist with a book name like that).

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Wonderful photos Andrew! I agree with the foot note on architecture elevating the human spirit, this was Luis Barragan's only purpose of designing living spaces.

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Thank you Xavi and thank you for sharing the name Luis Barragan. I haven't come across his work before. His buildings look beautiful. I love this quotation: "The Art of Seeing. It is essential to an architect to know how to see: I mean, to see in such a way that the vision is not overpowered by rational analysis."

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Love it! Personally I have learned a lot more as a photographer from other disciplines like architecture and design. Maybe not technically but philosophically and spiritually.

I did a short piece on Barragan's last work if you want to check it out:

https://open.substack.com/pub/xavibuendia/p/elevating-the-spirit?utm_source=share&utm_medium=android&r=1ivi2z

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Ah I now recall reading it but the name of the architect didn't register at the time. I love your photos.

I agree photography does encourage learning. I'm very new to reading about architecture and am using photography as my gateway into discovering more about it. Substack is the perfect vehicle to share my findings.

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Totally agree, keep at it, really enjoy reading your posts and looking at your photos.

I had to take those snaps on a phone since they don't allow cameras when visiting the house. They're ok but wished I was allowed to use one.

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You took great photos. I wasn’t aware that you had used an iPhone.

I had a similar experience at 2 Willow Rd in Hampstead (Ernö Goldfinger’s home) recently. We weren’t allowed to take photos because the National Trust don’t have the copyright for the art on the walls. Such a shame as I wanted to do a post on it.

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deletedJul 15, 2023Liked by Andrew Eberlin
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Thank you Julie. Glad it helped you start your day with some joy!

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