21 Comments

Some amazing photos here ...

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this is awesome!

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Some wonderful photos. Beckett means so much to me, so that photo has always had an electric quality beyond the stare, the wonderful face and the stunning capture.

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Thank you Matt. I love that Jane Bown used to carry her Olympus in a shopping basket and always used natural light. Apparently Beckett was not very cooperative with her but she managed to corner him at the back of the theatre and took (I think) five very quick frames.

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That context makes it a bit more special. I'm currently reading Sontag, on the reliability of war photography and responsibility of war photographers. Apparently only two official UK photographers were given Thatcher's permission to photograph the Falklands conflict. McCullin didn't make the cut!

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I'm guessing McCullin would have photographed the horrific side of war rather than the heroic side...

Do you know which two made the cut?

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The essay doesn't say. The most famous photograph from that conflict is the 'Yomper' shot from naval photographer Pete Holdgate. He was a navy commando. It seems that it was the Navy's call, rather than government – this from an online British Journal Of Photography interview: '[McCullin] was desolate when he was refused press accreditation to cover the Falklands War between Britain and Argentina in 1982, assuming that the-then British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher had banned him because his photographs might prove too disturbing politically. Very recently he found out that it had been an innocuous administrative decision by the Royal Navy which had already allocated its available press slots. “Bureaucracy is the worst religion,” he growls.'

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Interesting. Thank you.

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Dec 16, 2022Liked by Andrew Eberlin

Kids jumping on mattresses. I remember playing on a building site when I was young but not to this level! Also the creepy doll?? This photo has so much going on!

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It's amazing what we kids were allowed to do 40 years ago! The photo has so much to take in and that creepy doll takes it to another level.

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Fabulous post. I'd say McCullin's 'Thousand Yard Stare' makes my list. Lee Miller in Hitler's Bath ... interesting at so many levels. I think the event that, for me, perhaps because of the consequent impact on my military career, spawned so many impossible-to-forget images was 9/11 ... this gallery just about covers it https://edition.cnn.com/interactive/2021/09/us/9-11-photos-cnnphotos/

Fascinating post and one that really prompts some thought. B

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Yes, both the photos and those on the link are powerful photos and worthy contenders. Narrowing it down to eight is an impossible task.

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So rad. Thanks for the future journal inspiration! Loved seeing the familiar & unfamiliar favorites of yours :-)

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Thanks Phoenix. Intrigued to know what would make your list!

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You and I have exchanged comments on one or two of these before Andrew, and I share your admiration for Jane Bowen and Tish Murtha, who of course did a lot of her work in and around the area in which I now live. While I don't have your 'eye' I'll take up your challenge in my Substack post of next week. 😊

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We have Harry and I'm very sorry I didn't have space for Chris Killip (a very hard decision) who also took many photos in the North East during the 70's and 80's. I look forward to seeing your next Substack!

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It will be next week's Andrew, tomorrow's 'plea for money' is already drafted.... 😉

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Good stuff, Andrew! What a fun post.

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Thanks Andy. I wonder what would be on your list?

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I'd choose, among b&w photos, a Margaret Bourke-White photo ("There's no way like the American way!") and for sure one from Robert Frank's "The Americans". And Bruce Davidson too. Well, Henri Cartier-Bresson and Robert Doisneau too (I know, I'm not very original). But it's a very hard choice.

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Good choices. I was very close to adding Robert Frank's 'Trolley — New Orleans' and Robert Doisneau's 'The Kiss by Hotel de Ville' (for nostalgic reasons - I had it on my student bedroom wall).

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